Writing

reflections 2013.JPG

The Reflection contest writing was a great way to use our Writer's workshop choice writing time.


How to Write an Opinion Essay

How to Write an Opinion Essay

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, eHow Contributor


  1. Instructions

    • 1Determine your topic. It can be any broad topic, such as cars, sports, fruit, or medicine.
    • 2Formulate your opinion into a single-sentence thesis statement. Your thesis statement is the most important sentence in the essay. It states an opinion that can be argued for or against. For example, if you're external image icon1.png about fruit, your thesis statement might be the following: Of all of the many types of fruit, apples contain the most nutritional value. That's a thesis statement, your opinion in a single sentence.

    • 3Introduce your topic and thesis statement in the opening paragraph of your opinion essay. The opening paragraph is commonly referred to as your introduction.
    • 4Conduct research to support your thesis statement. The depth of the research depends on the length and complexity of your essay. For a external image icon1.png essay of a few pages, three or four examples supporting your opinion might suffice. For a longer essay, you might need eight or 10 pieces of evidence to support your opinion.
    • 5Draft the body of your opinion essay using your supporting evidence. Each piece of supporting evidence should be presented in a separate paragraph.
    • 6Conduct research on opposing arguments, then refute these arguments in the body of your essay. Each opposing point of view should be presented in a separate paragraph. Presenting an opponent's point of view and refuting that point of view gives the reader the impression that you've considered all points of view. Consequently, your opinion essay will be more persuasive.
    • 7Conclude your essay by summarizing your argument. You can also offer a memorable one-line ending, or you can provide the reader with additional thoughts to consider relative to your argument. If you provide additional thoughts for the reader to consider, these thoughts, although not dealt with directly in your essay, should implicitly support your thesis.
    • 8Give your essay a catchy title. Writing your title last will allow you to pick the most interesting aspect of your essay for use as a title. It could be your thesis statement or some other interesting part of your essay.

Tips & Warnings

  • Writing in first person can make your essay more personal.
  • Writing in third person can make your essay seem more objective and professional.
  • The tone of your writing can also affect your argument. For example, if you're writing a satirical essay about corrupt politicians, a sarcastic tone could be very effective. If you're writing a professional essay about the harmful effects of a new medication, an objective and authoritative tone might be very effective.
  • Cite your sources. Do not try to pass off other people's ideas as your own. In addition to being discourteous to other writers, it is illegal to plagiarize.


Read more: How to Write an Opinion Essay | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5619030_write-opinion-essay.html#ixzz2RDYefVW3


Here is some contest writing by: Jacquelyn, Tori, Leah, Emilia, and Grace:

1. Look for text features in non fiction or informational books



Look for text features in your informational writing.

2. List topics you could write about for non fiction writing or informational writing.

  • Demonstrate how you consider topics that you already know about and care about in your life and in the world that you would like to teach others. For example, consider places you visit frequently on vacation, attractions in your area, and science or social studies topics that have caught your interest.

3. Select a topic and make a list, graphic organizer or outline with sub topics. Homework

So writers, remember that authors of informational texts often rehearse by writing all that they know about a topic before they decide how much research they will need to do. Today you will turn to a new page in your writer’s notebook and write the topic at the top of the page. Then, write all you know about each subtopic that you have listed in your writer’s notebook. Keep note of areas where your information seems weak. If you think of new subtopics, add them to your list and write about them, too.
Write Topics I Know a Lot About on the top of the next page in your writer’s notebook. List one topic that you could write about and put a box around it.
Have students think about a topic that they know a lot about and care about in their lives or in the world – one that they would like to teach to others.
  • Explain that you will be writing about topics and subtopics. Subtopics are categories of information that you have about your bigger topic.
  • Ask yourself,
    • What do I want to say to my readers?
    • What do I think is important for someone to know and feel after reading my piece?
    • What are some categories of information, or subtopics, that I know about this topic?
  • List points (categories of information) across your fingers and elaborate about each category. Say as much as you can as you point to each finger. In this way, you are planning the categories for your topic that will become your subtopics.
  • Record two or three subtopics next to bullets underneath your topic.
  • Have students ask themselves the questions
    • What do I want to say to my readers?
    • What do I think is important for someone to know and feel after reading my piece?
    • What are some categories of information, or subtopics, that I know about this topic?
    then turn and talk to their partners, listing points across their fingers and elaborating about each subtopic.
  • Invite students who connect with the topics being shared to add those topics to their list or help the writing who is sharing to addmore sub topics.

Writers, whenever we decide to write an informational text, we always plan our categories first. As you work today, continue to generate more topics that you would like to teach others and add them to your list. Think about all that you know about each topic.

4. Today, we will choose one topic that we know a lot about and write all that we know about that topic. We will keep in mind areas where our information seems weak

.
  • Explain that informational writers probably think about more than one topic before they begin writing a book. They try out the topic by writing all that they knew about the topic first to see if they have enough information to write a whole book and how much research they will need to do.
  • Demonstrate how you choose a topic and related subtopics from one of the pages in your writer’s notebook. Choose two subtopics and begin writing all that you know about each one. Show students that sometimes you have a lot to say about one subtopic, and very little to say about another. Note areas where your information seems weak.
  • Explain that subtopics need to be parallel, or of equal weight. For example:
    • All subtopics should be of equal importance.
    • All subtopics should generally be the same length when they are written.
  • Have students choose a topic that they have already organized using boxes and bullets.
  • Have them turn and share as much information as they can about two subtopics, keeping in mind that they need note areas where their information seems weak.
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So writers, remember that authors of informational texts often rehearse by writing all that they know about a topic before they decide how much research they will need to do. Today you will turn to a new page in your writer’s notebook and write the topic at the top of the page. Then, write all you know about each subtopic that you have listed in your writer’s notebook. Keep note of areas where your information seems weak. If you think of new subtopics, add them to your list and write about them, too.

(Writers, most subtopics fall into the categories of parts, kinds, or times. Look at each of your subtopics and decide if it tells about the parts of your topic, if it tells about the kinds of your topic, or if it tells about the times of your topic. Some informational books only include one of these categories, and others include more than one. If your subtopics fall into these categories, then they are probably parallel and would work well for your topic. )


5. Writers of informational books jot all they know about another topic

Include a variety of facts, details, and statistics,
begin a list of important vocabulary words
  • Begin writing all that you know about this topic and its subtopics. Consider the subtopics carefully, checking to make sure they are parallel and of equal weight. Plan on including about four chapters in your own informational book. Some students may write one or two additional chapters.
  • Push yourself to remember and include a variety of facts, details, and statistics from information that you know and from information that you have read about the topic.
You can always go back and revise your topics, making them broader. Sometimes your topics are too big or too small. Some of your topics might really be subtopics. Some of your subtopics might really be topics. Be flexible in making changes.


  • Choose the topic they know the most about and then narrow their focus and perspective on that topic. For example, the topic, “Cheetahs Are Endangered” narrows the topic, “Cheetahs,” and gives a perspective, “Are Endangered.” Have students make a commitment to write their informational book about that topic.
  • Explain that information writers often begin a list of important vocabulary words that might be difficult for their reader and make a list. Demonstrate how this works with your own topic by making a list in your writer’s notebook.
  • Have students begin a list of important vocabulary wordsfor their topics in their writer’s notebooks. Later in this unit, students will include some of these words in a glossary.
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Lesson- Selecting a topic

Writing Topics 9-18-12

Authority List
Make a list of 3-5 topics you will want to write about this month
Presidents or Constitution should be on your list
Try this link or use one of the books from our library
http://kids.usa.gov/

http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=245088 video link


Topic list

Highlight with a highlighter or use a pencil and underline 5 topics you might write about this year.


Notes

Start writing under the notes . Be sure you put your name first so we remember.
E mail your notes to your school e mail address so we can save the work to your H-drive or to your wiki digital back pack page.